Superchunk Archive

Your Three Best Amigos Play Secret Stages

Your Three Best Amigos Play Secret Stages

 Sometimes You Make Love…

…and sometimes you get fucked!

By Andy Harris

 

“If every tiny town had local heroes this good, no one would leave home.” —Kenneth Partridge, M Music & Musicians Magazine


Amigo is the best band in Charlotte. In fact, they are probably the best band in North Carolina. They might even be the best band in America and, while I’m hyperbolizing (which is evil), I have to say that Amigo is the World’s Greatest Band.

It’s a reasonable statement. The songs are great. The vocals, which come in waves of solo, two-part, and three-part harmony, are as real as it gets. Unless you’ve had an easy life, you’ll identify with the lyrics. You’ll find a new favorite song. And, oh yes, the live performance. Amigo is a hard-rocking power trio that brings to mind the slogan from my high school wrestling T-shirt: “Brute force with finesse.”

Time To Make The Donuts

It’s all true. Amigo consists of band members Slade Baird (guitar,vocals), Adam Phillips (drums, vocals) and Thomas Alverson (bass guitar, vocals). The band plays a masterful blend of Americana, honky-tonk and rock and roll. 2014’s critically acclaimed album (American Songwriter, Elmore Magazine) Might Could is great from start to finish….

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Mac McCaughan (of Superchunk)

Mac McCaughan (of Superchunk)

Mac McCaughan ( of Superchunk )

Holy Youth

Mac McCaughan. Superchunk frontman Mac McCaughan was ready to take a collection of unused tracks he had written for various movie soundtracks and assemble a new solo album. He needed only to write a few more songs to round out what was supposed to be an invigorating power pop record. Sounds easy enough, right?
However, upon employing some dusty synths on the tracks “Your Hologram” and “Only Do,” McCaughan realized that he wanted to use the album, eventually titled Non-Believers, to explore his fascination with that early-’80s era of music when punk evolved into something more introspective, focusing on themes of isolation and eventually turning into post-punk and new wave. As he puts it, he was thinking about a time when bands were “using keyboards and drum machines to relate through their music a disaffection or alienation” from society, school, whatever. However, what really captivated McCaughan was that these artists, particularly British bands like The Cure, OMD, and Cocteau Twins, could end up making such emotionally affecting, even romantic, music when tackling these themes. As McCaughan points out, “I’m constantly discovering and consuming new music, so why does an old…

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