moon hooch Archive

Moon Hooch

moon hooch

Versatility by definition is an adjective used to describe something or someone as a variable or changeable, as in feeling, purpose or policy. I could not think of a better term to describe the three piece band out of Brooklyn known as Moon Hooch. Each member is from a completely different background. Wenzl McGowen (Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone and Contrabass) was born in the Canary Islands. Mike Wilbur (Tenor Saxophone, Vocals and Synth) was born and raised in Brockton, MA. James Muschler (drums) was born and raised in Cleveland. They came together while studying at New York’s prestigious New School. This is where Moon Hooch found its feeling, purpose and the policy with what they call Cave Music in the city’s subways. Fresh off a European tour, James Muschler took some time to culture Mother Plug Music on Cave Music and just how versatile Moon Hooch is!

Hey James, how are you doing?

JAMES: I’m doing great, how are you?

I’m good! Thank you for asking. So you guys just got back from touring in Europe?

James: Yea we did. It was awesome! The crowds were really receptive and crazy! And actually the first time we toured over there was about three years ago and we’ve been to the…

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Moon Hooch w/ Koa

Moon Hooch

Moon Hooch captured the imaginations of thousands with its infamous stints busking on subway platforms and elsewhere in New York City: two sax players and a drummer whipping up furious, impromptu raves. This happened with such regularity at the Bedford Ave station in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, that the band was banned from playing there by the NYPD. The trio’s subsequent tours with They Might Be Giants, Lotus, and Galactic as well as on their own have only broadened the band’s appeal. Wherever Moon Hooch plays, a dance party soon follows.

Hornblow Recordings and Palmetto Records are now proud to release Moon Hooch’s second album, This Is Cave Music, on Sept 16, 2014. The title refers to the term Moon Hooch coined to describe their unique sound: like house music, but more primitive and jagged and raw. Horn players Mike Wilbur and Wenzl McGowen do this by utilizing unique tonguing methods, or adding objects — cardboard or PVC tubes, traffic cones, whatever’s handy — to the bells of their horns to alter their sound. Not to be outdone, drummer James Muschler gets swelling, shimmering sounds from his cymbals, and covers the head of his snare with a stack of splash cymbals…

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