Ingrid Michaelson Archive

Ingrid Michaelson

To say Ingrid Michaelson is prolific is an understatement: In just a decade, she has released six albums (five of which have charted) and ten singles (eight charted). But to say she’s an emotional multitasker? That’s a relatively new accomplishment for her. The love’s-labors-lost banger “Hell No,” is her first single in a year. It’s also surprisingly playful. Because over the past two years, Michaelson has grappled with not only the personal and familial sickness chronicled in her previous album, ‘Lights Out,’ but also the death of her mother and demise of her marriage. For some, it can take a lifetime to navigate the stages of so much grief. But Michaelson did it in record time.

Her new album, the aptly named ‘It Doesn’t Have to Make Sense’ (out August 26, Cabin 24/RED), is a powerfully honest time capsule of her undoings and rebirths. “Allowing myself to not try to make everything make sense was freeing for me,” she explains the New York-based singer. “Life doesn’t always make sense.”

Previously, her glass-half-full outlook served her richly. It started with beautiful, idiosyncratic creations such as “The Way I Am” (2007) and “Maybe” (2009), songs that have breathed life into everything from “Grey’s…

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Ingrid Michaelson

Ingrid Michaelson

Ingrid Michaelson

JUKEBOX THE GHOST, OH HONEY

Ingrid Michaelson.

Jukebox The Ghost. Jukebox the Ghost’s third album Safe Travels marks a period in the band’s career that’s steeped in change, both personally and professionally. Relationships dissolved and crumbled. Loved ones passed on. The band themselves relocated from Philadelphia to New York City and played over 200 shows since the release of their last album in 2010. In the midst of so much change, the band spent months in the studio creating what would become Safe Travels, a record that represents a shift in the band’s creative trajectory.

“It felt like the music was finally growing with us—Songs that relate to who we are as people right now, not who we were when we were 19 or 20,” Siegel said. “This record is more heartfelt; part of that came from not worrying about exactly what kind of music we were supposed to be making and instead just working on songs that felt genuine and natural at the time.”

Safe Travels, at its core, represents three people going through universal life changes—A way of coping with how quickly things can turn around, for good and bad. And though it’s clear their sound…

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